Articles Tagged with School Lawsuit

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A former teacher in Illinois has prevailed over his erstwhile employer in court. Bruce Vukadinovich sued the Hanover Community School Corp. for age discrimination, retaliation and violation of due process. Although the court rejected the discrimination and retaliation claims, Vukadinovich was awarded more than $200,000 for the due process claim.

you-are-firedThe story began years ago in a different school district. Back then, Vukadinovich was working for Hammond Schools when he filed a lawsuit against his employer for age discrimination. That lawsuit was settled, and the plaintiff went on to Hanover Central High School. He worked there for eight years until his contract was terminated in a workforce reduction. Vukadinovich sought answers from the district about why he was fired, but couldn’t get a straight answer. That’s when he filed the lawsuit against the Hanover Community School Corp.

The wrinkle is that a school district official who worked for Hammond Schools when Vukadinovich sued that district had recently transferred over to the Hanover Community School Corp. Vukadinovich believed that his firing was an act of retaliation over his earlier successful suit against Hammond Schools.

Several years of litigation followed, with Vukadinovich representing himself against his former employer. A jury and a judge ultimately agreed with the plaintiff that he was denied due process. In his decision, Judge Philip Simon wrote: “To put it bluntly, after several years of presiding over this litigation, including a five day jury trial, I cannot tell you why Vukadinovich was terminated.” The judge went on to say that the jury sympathized with Vukadinovich’s desire to receive a “straight-forward explanation” for his firing.

The judge also took issue with the school district’s claim that they didn’t tell Vukadinovich why he was terminated because he didn’t ask. Arguing that the situation was “not a game of ‘Guess the Reason You’re Being Fired,'” Simon pointed out that the reason should have been disclosed up front so that Vukadinovich could have defended himself.

This case demonstrates the importance of keeping documentation citing all of the reasons for an adverse employment action. Doing so may prevent a lawsuit from being filed.

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A former student in San Diego has been awarded more than $1.25 million stemming from an incident in which she was forced to relieve herself in a bucket.

need-to-pee-118755742-001Back in 2012, the 14 year-old student was in a 25-minute advisory class at Patrick Henry High School when she felt the urgent need to urinate. The short class was designed so students could study. This particular session was being presided over by art teacher Gonja Wolf. Teachers had been told that frequent bathroom breaks would undermine the efficacy of the class. Wolf believed that the school did not allow any bathroom breaks during the advisory class, so she searched for an alternative.

As it happens, Wolf had already invested in a bucket that was intended to provide an alternative to using the bathroom in the case of a lockdown. The teacher admitted to having used the bucket herself when she was working late. Accordingly, she took the student to an adjacent supply closet where she gave her the bucket and instructed her to flush the contents down the sink when she was done.

It wasn’t long before word got out about the incident. Local media had a field day, and the result was that the student was teased relentlessly. An excess of gossip and lewd texts drove the student into depression. An eventual suicide attempt drove her to seek ongoing medical care. Between the media glare and the unwanted attention from fellow students, she was forced to switch schools twice before finally graduating from a charter school.

The girl and her family initially asked the district for $25,000 in compensation, a request that was denied. Nonetheless, officials offered an apology and help for the anguished student. It’s unlikely they imagined that the case would one day be settled in the courtroom, leaving them without $1.25 million in damages plus $41,000 for medical expenses.

District officials say that they may appeal the jury’s decision. Testimony at trial indicated that the district’s teachers are now told to allow bathroom breaks during all periods. Nonetheless, this has been an embarrassing chapter for everyone concerned.

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Longtime educator Alan Cohen has sued his former employer after being fired. Cohen was employed for 13 months by Speyer Legacy School, which advertises itself as an institution for intellectually gifted children in grades kindergarten through eighth grade. The exclusive private school charges students approximately $40,000 per year to attend.

you are fired 2Cohen spent 20 years working for New York City’s Department of Education before becoming the head of the lower school at the prestigious Portledge School. He made the move to Speyer where he was named the Assistant Head of the school as well as the Head of the lower school. Things appeared to go well. Teachers, administrators, parents and students all took to Cohen. Then, the school’s newly appointed Head Dr. Barbara Tischler told Cohen about another faculty member who was asking questions about Cohen’s sexuality.

Cohen, who happens to be gay, quickly discovered that his sexual orientation was a hot topic of conversation among faculty, administrators and board members. One board member even tried to set up Cohen on a blind date with one of her male friends. Additionally, Dr. Tischler asked Cohen if he could give advice to another administrator at the school. The other administrator was a lesbian, and there was widespread feeling among members of the board that her masculine dress and appearance would render her unsuitable for the Dean of Admissions position.

Cohen brought his concerns over the focus on his sexual orientation to Tischler, but to no avail. In April 2016, Cohen was informed that his contract was not going to be renewed.

Cohen has gone on to find employment at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. A married, heterosexual woman now holds his old job at Speyer. Nonetheless, Cohen’s experiences at the exclusive school suggest an atmosphere of discrimination that violates both state and federal law. Situations like this remind employers how important it is to work with an employment law attorney to avoid ¬†discriminatory actions.

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A lawsuit has been launched by the ACLU against Kansas City Public Schools. In the complaint, the plaintiff alleges that a seven year-old child, who weighed less than 50 pounds and was not even four feet tall, was handcuffed before being led to the principal’s office after a classroom disturbance.

Wooden gavel and handcuffsThe incident occurred in April 2014. Kalyb Primm, a student with a slight hearing impediment, was asked by his teacher to move to another seat in their classroom at George Melcher Elementary School. Primm alleges in the lawsuit that he was being teased and bullied, which led him to cry and yell. A school resource officer named Brandon Craddock was passing by and heard the disturbance.

Entering the classroom, Craddock tried to join the teacher’s efforts to quiet Primm. When these efforts didn’t succeed he asked Primm twice to accompany him to the office of the school’s principal Anne Wallace. The complaint says that Primm became frightened once outside the classroom, crying again and trying to walk away. Craddock attempted to lead Primm to the principal’s office by the arm, but the child grasped a railing with his free hand. Allegedly without trying to find a way to de-escalate the situation, Craddock handcuffed the boy, taking him to the office where he sat quietly for 10 to 15 minutes while waiting for his father to arrive.

The ACLU lawsuit argues that Primm’s Constitutional rights were violated by the actions of the school resource officer. Among the allegations, the complaint says that Primm was unlawfully seized and restrained. ACLU legal director Tony Rothert remarked that, “Gratuitously handcuffing children is cowardly and violates the constitution.” Moreover, the action may have been a violation of state law. Plaintiffs are requesting attorney’s fees and compensation for damages. Additionally, the complaint asks for enhanced training regarding constitutional rights for school resource officers in the region.

This lawsuit is still in its early stages. Nonetheless, it demonstrates the pressing need for law enforcement, security officials, schools and businesses to be aware of the constitutional rights of every citizen, and to actively work to support those rights.

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The Third Circuit Court has ruled in favor of a Pennsylvania school district in a lawsuit brought by the family of a student who was assaulted on a school campus. The assault occurred in the 2012-2013 school year at Chester High School, which is within the boundaries of the defendant in the lawsuit, Chester Upland School District.

Stop school violence road signThe victim was Alphonzo Green, a high school freshman at the time of the assault. Chester High had abolished the issuance of student identification cards, and was not requiring visitors to register at the office or wear a pass. A trespasser entered the campus on a day that is referred to as “National Fight Day” with the apparent object of assaulting several students. Green was one of these.

Green’s father, Alphonzo King, filed a lawsuit against the school district, citing their lax security policies as having caused the attack on his son. According to the complaint, Green’s civil rights had been violated and the district had fostered a dangerous condition when it did away with the ID card requirements. Thus, the complaint argued, Green’s due process was violated.

A district court decided in favor of the defendant, but King chose to appeal to a higher court. The three judge panel sided with the lower court, finding that the claim did not meet four criteria that would have proven the school district’s liability. Mainly, the judges relied upon whether or not the district’s decision not to provide student identification cards was an affirmative act that created a situation that was dangerous for the plaintiff. They concluded that the omission of ID cards did not constitute an affirmative act.

Moreover, the judges felt that the plaintiff couldn’t demonstrate how the physical assault was a “fairly direct” consequence of the school’s refusal to issue ID cards. The plaintiff could only succeed with this claim if he proved that the lack of student ID cards somehow provided the impetus for the physical assault. Arguing that the attack was the result of “random criminal conduct,” the judges decided that the district bore no liability in the incident.

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An online charter school in Ohio filed a lawsuit against the state’s Department of Education in an effort to block an attendance audit.

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The Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow, known as ECOT, advertises that it enrolls more than 15,000 students. This means that the facility is larger than most of the traditional public school districts. The tremendous number of students entitles ECOT to approximately $107 million in annual funding from the state.

ECOT is unlike traditional schools in that students log on via the Internet. Officials from the Department of Education want to audit ECOT’s attendance records to determine whether or not they genuinely have 15,000 students and whether or not those learners are meeting the 920 hours threshold that is mandated by state law. This means that students would have to log in for approximately five hours each day.

ECOT consultant Neil Clark argues that students are not required to complete 920 hours of classroom time. He asserts instead that 920 hours of learning opportunities are required to be presented. Moreover, Clark says that the government never asked for “documentation of log-in durations” in prior audits to determine how much funding ECOT would receive. Clark also suggests that the government is trying to retroactively apply new standards that do not apply because of the contract between ECOT and the government.

ECOT is not the first charter school to experience political turmoil recently in Ohio. In 2015, a smaller online school was found to have misrepresented its attendance numbers, with the result being that they had to return 80 percent of the money they had received from the state.

Officials at ECOT may be trying to avoid a similar fate. However, they are wise to ask that the Department of Education live up to an existing contract. Neil Clark declares that the school “successfully passed audits in 2003, 2006, 2011 and ten other audits” that were conducted by a different accrediting body. According to his statements, ECOT is not against being audited, they simply want the government to do so within the terms of their contract.