Articles Tagged with Los Angeles Employment Lawyer

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A decision in a California lawsuit may have implications for retail employers who require workers to be available for on-call shifts. Under the decision, it may be wise for such employers to consider whether or not their employees are entitled by law to compensation for their time when they are requested to “report to work” by telephone.

clock-overtime-110616811-001Ward v. Tilly’s, Inc. is a class action lawsuit filed by Skylar Ward, an employee of retail chain Tilly’s. The plaintiff alleges that her employer institutes a policy of on-call shifts in which employees are required to call in two hours in advance to ask the employer if they are needed. In the complaint, attorneys argue that such an obligation triggers an employer responsibility to compensate the employee for their time under the California Industrial Welfare Commission’s Wage Orders.

The Wage Orders state that when an employee complies with a requirement to report for work, they are entitled to half of their usual pay or no less than two-hours’ pay. Tilly’s policy stated that employees should assume that they were scheduled to work up until the moment they were told that they weren’t needed. This meant that employees would have to schedule their time as if they were going to be working, leading to arrangements for childcare, giving up social engagements and being unable to schedule academic courses.

Under Tilly’s policy, employees could be disciplined for failing to call in or for refusing to work an on-call shift. Such actions received the same discipline as missing a regularly scheduled shift.

Ward’s complaint was refused by the trial court. An appeal brought the case before the Court of Appeal, which reversed the trial court’s findings two to one. Appeal judges determined that reporting for work under the definition in the Wage Orders means “presenting oneself as ordered.”

The dissenting opinion argued that the Wage Order’s intent applied to the employee’s physical presence at the store. Nonetheless, the outcome of this matter demonstrates the need for employers to review their pre-shift call-in policy to bring it in line with the findings in Ward v. Tilly’s.

If you are an California employer or business owner with questions about any legal issue feel free to contact me, attorney Richard Oppenheim at 818-461-8500 or via the Contact form on this page.

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When a worker suffers an on-the-job injury, what sort of accommodation is her employer legally required to make to ensure her ability to return to work? The law is deliberately vague on this subject, generally stating that employers must make “reasonable” accommodations. Failing to do so can lead to legal headaches.

Wrongful-TerminationThat’s the case for Dignity Health in California. Dignity manages St. John’s Pleasant Valley Hospital. Virginia Hoover had been working at the hospital for approximately 24 years as a radiologic technologist. In 2014, she suffered an injury to her shoulder while moving some equipment. The hospital granted her a leave of absence for recovery.

By August 2014, Hoover was cleared to return, but she was given limitations. She wasn’t supposed to lift anything heavier than 15 pounds with her non-dominant left arm and she was not permitted to raise that arm above her head. However, Hoover claims that Dignity made no effort to accommodate these restrictions. She was fired in December 2014 after her employer concluded that she couldn’t perform her duties.

Hoover filed a lawsuit against Dignity in 2016. Recently, a jury awarded her just over one million dollars for lost wages and emotional distress. The plaintiff claimed that Dignity had wrongfully terminated her and discriminated against her based on her age. Among the claims, Hoover says that another employee with similar restrictions had been accommodated by the hospital to remain in their position.

Dignity argued that they accommodated Hoover by granting her a leave of absence and then working with her to return to her duties. However, supervisors ultimately concluded that she wasn’t capable of performing the essential functions of her job.

In such cases, the law states that employers must find alternative work for an employee, but no documents from the lawsuit indicate whether or not this was attempted.

If you are an employer and one of your workers gets injured on the job, do you know how to comply with the relevant laws? Failing to do so can result in a costly lawsuit and negative publicity. If you are an California employer or business owner with questions about on the job injuries or any legal issue feel free to contact me, attorney Richard Oppenheim at 818-461-8500 or via the Contact form on this page.

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One of the questions I hear frequently is about whether we are accepting new clients.

While the short answer is “Yes”, here is some additional information which many people find interesting.

Great%20Fit%20Gears%2039896521-001.jpgOur law firm, Sylvester Oppenheim & Linde is committed to client service and quality legal representation for each and every client. That means that we only accept clients who we feel are a good match for our expertise, experience and areas of practice.

I learned a long time ago that we can’t be all things to all clients, but we can be all things to some clients: and those are the ones we welcome and serve in an exemplary manner.

The purpose of this blog is to provide helpful information to anyone who reads it. On our website, you will find another example of our “Be of Service” mind-set by reading our Home Page Article “Eleven Questions to ask BEFORE Hiring a Business Attorney“. You will also find a list of our practice areas on that page.

Our clients tell us that they appreciate our honesty, accessibility and guidance. And we appreciate our clients.

Back to the question. The answer is: “Yes, we are always looking for one or two new good clients.” If you have a legal issue, I invite you to call and let’s find out whether we are a great fit for each other. I can be reached at 818-461-8500 or via the Contact form on this page.

Richard Oppenheim

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Facebook is facing legal woes as a group of plaintiffs charges the tech giant with making it possible for companies to post employment advertisements in a discriminatory manner. The plaintiffs include the American Civil Liberties Union, a coalition for workers and three women who were seeking employment.

Smart-Phone-with-Apps-48915227-001In addition to Facebook, 10 employers are named as defendants in the complaint. Plaintiffs say that Facebook’s ad-targeting technology made it possible for these employers to direct their help-wanted ads exclusively to men. The jobs on offer included truck drivers, law enforcement officers and sales clerks at sporting goods retailers.

The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission received the complaint, which argues that since an increasing number of job and housing applicants are conducting their searches online, it has been increasingly easy for employers and landlords to engage in discriminatory practices. Under federal law, it is illegal for employers and landlords to discriminate against people based on their race, religion, gender, national origin, disability status or other protected categories.

However, in the online world, it is routine for tech companies to use algorithms that fast-track certain ads to specific users. Facebook excels at “microtargeting” users for certain advertisements. Additionally, the social media platform allows users to click on a link that says “Why am I seeing this?” This feature is actually what prompted lawyers with the ACLU to file the complaint.

Outten & Golden, a Washington, D.C. law firm, performed an experiment in which people used Facebook to search for a job or otherwise indicate that they were engaged in a job hunt. Employment ads for the 10 employers named in the suit were displayed for the male job candidates but not for the female ones. The Facebook users then clicked on the “Why am I seeing this?” link, where it was stated that their gender played a role in the targeting of that particular ad to that user.

This is not the first such complaint that has been lodged against Facebook. An earlier EEOC complaint alleged that Facebook employment ads were targeted to unfairly exclude older employees. Both of these cases are pending.

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Employers don’t always have an easy time when it comes to accommodating the religious beliefs of workers. Understanding nuanced belief systems and balancing that with company objectives leads to legal friction. That’s the case in a lawsuit that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or EEOC, filed against Memorial Healthcare in Michigan.

Employment-Contract-44108074-001According to the complaint, medical transcriptionist Yvonne Bair received an offer of employment from Memorial Healthcare. The prospective employer informed Bair of its requirement that all employees receive the flu vaccination. Bair refused the vaccination on religious grounds, saying that her belief in Jesus Christ led her to reject injecting or ingesting any foreign substances. The hospital suggested that Bair could take the nasal spray flu vaccine, but Bair again refused.

Memorial then rescinded its employment offer, despite the fact that Bair told them that she would wear a mask. According to the employer’s policy, it’s acceptable for employees to wear a mask when they cannot get a vaccination.

Bair took her complaint to the EEOC, which filed a lawsuit on her behalf. The EEOC charges that Memorial violated Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act when it rescinded the employment offer. According to the act, employers cannot discriminate against employees based on religious beliefs. Instead, employers must strive to provide reasonable accommodations that allow workers to observe personal religious practices.

Why did Memorial rescind the offer of employment when they have a policy allowing unvaccinated employees to wear a mask as an alternative? Bair would eventually have become a work-from-home employee, so the chances of her transmitting the flu to co-workers or patients would likely have been minimal.

Perhaps Memorial had other reasons for deciding to go with another job candidate. However, unless they used proper documentation to support their decision, they may find themselves in a continuing legal battle.

It is vital for all employers to understand anti-discrimination employment laws. Additionally, it’s critical that employers proceed with extreme caution when it comes to hiring, firing and disciplinary decisions. Work with a qualified business attorney to make certain you stay on the right side of the law.

Feel free to contact attorney Rich Oppenheim by phone or message by using the “Contact” box in the right column of this blog.

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When a corporation hires a coach for an executive, that executive probably expects to hone skills that enable her to take on a more advanced role. However, that was not the experience had by Denise Stilwell, a former executive at Twentieth Century Fox.

Gender-Discrimination-105366239-001Stilwell began her employment with Fox in 1999. By 2013, she had been promoted to a vice president position in enterprise rights management. The position came with a four-year contract, which included a promise of promotion to a senior vice president position within the first two years.

Her immediate supervisor accepted a voluntary retirement package in 2016, which meant that she began reporting to Fox CFO Dean Hallett. Shortly after the change, Stilwell was summoned to Hallett’s office. She expected to be given a promotion. Instead, Hallett informed her that she “smiled too much,” and that an executive coach was going to begin working with her.

That coach was Jack Zwissig from Zwissig and Associates. Zwissig allegedly told Stilwell that her “smile is fake,” that she laughed too much and that people generally didn’t like her. Most troubling of all is Stilwell’s assertion that Zwissig told her that she should “lift her skirt.”

Stilwell reported Zwissig’s comments to Hallett, calling them sexist and improper. Almost immediately, she was reassigned to another executive vice president, Joanie Wallace, who refused to meet with her for months. Abruptly in January 2017, Stilwell was fired because her department wasn’t moving in the right direction.

Recently, Stilwell filed a lawsuit naming her former employer, Zwissig and Zwissig’s firm as defendants. The complaint levels charges of gender discrimination, retaliation and hostile work environment, among others. If she prevails, the plaintiff hopes to collect unspecified damages for loss of future earnings and benefits as well as emotional distress.

This situation acts as a vital reminder that all complaints regarding possible harassment and discrimination must be followed up on swiftly and thoroughly. Failing to do so often exacerbates the situation to a point that is difficult to control. Working closely with a qualified employment attorney is the best way to prevent these circumstances from occurring.

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A former employee of a Chicago-area Target store is suing the retail chain based on numerous claims. Perhaps most explosive among them is the accusation that Target systematically accuses Hispanic employees of using fake Social Security numbers.

Wrongful-TerminationEsmeralda Radek began working at Target in 2012. In 2014, the manager of the store where Radek worked received a letter that claimed that Radek was stealing from the store and selling the items on eBay. Moreover, the letter asserted that Radek had used a fake Social Security number during the hiring process.

Approximately one week after receiving the letter, human resources personnel at the store confronted Radek over the claim that she used a false Social Security number. Radek was requested to verify her Social Security information by providing the state in which the credential was issued. In response, Radek informed supervisors that she had been born in Texas, and that her mother had likely obtained the Social Security card for her.

Within a few days, Target terminated Radek’s employment on the grounds that she had used a fake Social Security number. However, Radek claims that she is not the only Hispanic employee at Target who has been accused of similar crimes. If these employees could later verify the authenticity of their credentials, they could be re-hired.

In April of 2014, Radek filed a complaint alleging that she had been fired based on her national origin. Additionally, the complaint alleged a negligence claim under Illinois state law, hostile work environment claims and asserted that Target had demonstrated a pattern of practice that discriminated against Hispanic employees.

Target filed a request to dismiss the case, and a U.S. District judge partially granted this request. Judge Lee dismissed the claims regarding the hostile work environment and pattern of practice, but said that Radek’s case regarding national origin discrimination may proceed.

When questions arise regarding an employee’s identification and other credentials, it is always advisable to proceed with caution. Consult with a qualified business and employment attorney before this type of situation arises so that your organization is prepared to respond in line with the law.

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It is vital for employers to understand any physical limitations that their employees have. Not responding appropriately can lead to serious legal trouble.

ADA-138029727-001It’s a situation that happened recently in Union City, Georgia where a police detective sued her former employer. Jacqueline Lewis is an African-American woman who had been employed by the department for 10 years when her career stumbled. Lewis suffered a heart attack in 2009 and was diagnosed with a chronic heart condition.

This condition didn’t render her unfit, so Lewis continued in her role until the department decided to require all employees to carry a Taser. As a part of the training, each employee was expected to submit to a five-second shock. Participants had to seek the consent of their physician prior to the training, but Lewis’ doctor refused permission because of her heart condition.

Lewis’ superiors placed her on administrative leave, and a series of mishaps appears to have worsened relations between Lewis’ doctor and the police department. By day 21 of her leave, Lewis had been terminated, with her employer arguing that she had exhausted her leave time.

Lewis promptly filed a discrimination lawsuit, citing disability, race and gender as the grounds. The complaint detailed the stories of two white, male officers who had been given considerably more time before they were terminated for not meeting the physical ability requirements.

A district court didn’t agree that Lewis had demonstrated her status as a qualified individual under ADA. Additionally, they said that the male employees she compared herself to were not “similarly situated.” Lewis appealed this decision, and the Eleventh Circuit found that Lewis’ heart problems did not make her disabled. However, the department’s decision to treat her as if she was gave her protection under ADA. The circuit court also argued that there may be evidence of gender and race discrimination. They ruled that the case should be decided by a jury.

This case illustrates how crucial it is for employers to treat their employees with care. That treatment may grant them some protection under the law to which they wouldn’t otherwise be entitled.

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James Damore, a former Google employee who made headlines last year after his written diatribe regarding why women are barred biologically from being successful at engineering, is making headlines again for suing the company.

Gender-Discrimination-105366239-001In his long and considerably detailed complaint, Damore alleges that the tech giant discriminates in its hiring policies against white, conservative men. He accuses the company of having hiring quotas for workers who are female or belong to an ethnic minority. Citing meetings in which department managers are singled out and chastised for not having reached their quota of female or minority workers, Damore says that it is difficult for a white man who does not hold liberal views to get ahead at Google.

Among the charges, Damore says that Google actively discriminates against white male employees who have “perceived conservative views by Google.” The complaint goes on to state that Google has a practice of disciplinary action against employees who “expressed views deviating from the majority view at Google on political subjects raised in the workplace ….”

Google’s own diversity reporting makes Damore’s claims seem at least partially spurious. The company’s latest reports say that their workforce is 69 percent male and 56 percent white. What is more, their technical employees are 80 percent male and 53 percent of these workers are white. This may make it difficult for Damore to support his claims in court.

At the same time, Google is being sued by four female former employees who say that the company openly discriminates against women, paying them less than male counterparts and making it more difficult for them to advance to more responsible positions. In fact, the government is already investigating Google for suspected discriminatory practices against females and minorities.

Google seems to be embattled on all sides thanks to these lawsuits. Their position is a stark reminder of how important it is to develop hiring, promotional, disciplinary and firing practices that are in strict accordance with the law. Working closely with a business and employment attorney is an excellent way to ensure that your company does not run afoul of the law.

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Most company executives are aware of the FMLA benefits due to expectant mothers who work at their firm. Perhaps they even provide those mothers with extra benefits, like a few weeks of paid leave just before or after the birth. While mothers certainly appreciate these benefits, it pays to be aware that new fathers may want and even be entitled to similar benefits. Failing to provide gender-neutral parental leave benefits may provide employees with the basis for a lawsuit.

EEOC_cooltext396845518This is the situation in which cosmetics company Estée Lauder finds itself. The EEOC recently filed a lawsuit against the company because it does not offer equal parental care leave to male and female employees. A pregnant female worker is eligible for as many as six weeks of paid leave and a flexible back-to-work benefit that may include shortened hours and the ability to work from home. Male employees receive just two weeks of paid leave and have no option to take advantage of the flexible back-to-work benefit.

The EEOC’s complaint says that the policy violates the Equal Pay Act and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act. Under these laws and others, the federal government requires that companies provide equal benefits and pay for the same work. This additionally means that these federal laws are gender neutral. In other words, both men and women are entitled to equal protection.

This is the second such lawsuit to be filed in recent memory. A J.P. Morgan Chase fraud investigator sued his employer because he was not offered the same parental-leave benefits as a female employee would receive. This earlier suit is still pending.

Employers are not legally required to provide paid parental leave for female or male workers. However, they are required to abide by federal laws like the FMLA that protect workers who want to take time to bond with their newborn child. Offering additional, paid-leave benefits for new parents can be a valuable perk that will attract outstanding talent to your firm. Nonetheless, it is critical to ensure that these benefits are offered on a gender-neutral basis to avoid lawsuits.