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Lawsuit Accuses Google of Allowing Third-Party Access to Emails

Is it acceptable for a third-party app developer to have access to private email inboxes? That’s the central question in a new class-action lawsuit that was filed in Sacramento. The lead plaintiff is James Coyne, an Ohio resident with a Gmail account, and he alleges that Google allows others to look at the emails in Gmail user’s inboxes for purposes of marketing and data mining.

Big-Brother-Spy-4Google has already pledged to stop scanning emails in user inboxes for advertising purposes. However, Coyne says that the company didn’t go far enough to protect user privacy. Google’s pledge came in the wake of another class-action suit in which the plaintiffs charged that their privacy rights were violated by the company’s practice of scanning incoming emails to generate targeted advertisements.

Nonetheless, the plaintiffs in this new case allege that the company continues to allow third parties to sift through the inboxes of users who sign up for certain email newsletters such as those that contain price comparison tools. The Wall Street Journal and other media outlets say that the purpose of this sifting is to mine data, produce new marketing efforts and other unspecified tasks.

Coyne argues that “Gmail users never provided consent to Google to provide privileged access to third-party developers.” He goes on to assert that this practice is in contrast with the company’s recent vow to make every effort to protect user privacy. The problem as Coyne sees it is that users might opt out of using Gmail if they knew that their emails would be scanned by strangers.

Google says that every third party that has access to Gmail inboxes is thoroughly vetted. This means that Google is satisfied that the third parties won’t use any data that they collect for nefarious purposes. Additionally, the company argues that third-party apps aren’t allowed to access inboxes until Gmail users are shown a permissions screen.

Coyne argues that the permissions screens don’t go far enough. Protecting data and customer privacy is increasingly important in this technology-driven era. Consult with a business attorney to ensure that you and your clients are sufficiently protected.