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Enforcement of California’s Net Neutrality Laws Put on Hold

Although California recently passed net neutrality laws, the state is putting its plan to implement these laws on hold. This is in response to the challenge that the Federal Communications Commission, or FCC, is facing at the federal level. If federal courts decide that current FCC regulations concerning net neutrality are illegal or unenforceable, then they will be undone. This would render California’s new laws moot.

Scales-of-Justice-Digital-94824052-001At the end of 2017, the FCC repealed Obama-era regulations regarding net neutrality. This means that no government authority is policing broadband providers to ensure that they are not unfairly throttling or discriminating against certain Internet content. California and other states decided to implement net neutrality laws at the state level in response to ensure a level playing field.

As soon as California passed their laws, the FCC sued the state, claiming that the state had no power to regulate what is essentially an interstate system. However, the FCC also is facing several lawsuits from companies like Public Knowledge, Vimeo and Mozilla. These lawsuits argue that the FCC’s new rules are plagued by factual and procedural issues.

If these lawsuits succeed, then the FCC’s most recent regulations will be voided in whole or in part. Such a decision would eliminate the need for California’s new net neutrality laws. California Attorney General Xavier Becerra decided against litigating the suit that the FCC filed. Instead, an agreement was reached between the U.S. Justice Department and the state to hold off on enforcing the state law.

In a statement, Becerra said, “… every action we launch is intended to put us in the best position to preserve net neutrality for the 40 million people of our state.” State Senator Scott Wiener similarly notes, “After the DC Circuit appeal is resolved, the litigation relating to California’s net neutrality law will then move forward.”

FCC official Ajit Pai has a different perspective. “This substantial concession reflects the strength of the case made by the United States earlier this month,” Pai said in a statement.

For now, the battle for net neutrality will continue to be fought in federal court.