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How well are anti-bullying policies being implemented in America’s schools? That question is at the heart of a case against Nevada’s Clark County School District. The parents who brought the case say that not only were they not informed about the bullying their sons suffered, but also that school officials did little to investigate or correct the situation.

schoolbullyingMothers Mary Bryan and Aimee Hairr had the assistance of the ACLU when they brought their lawsuit against the district. Their complaint detailed a horrific six months in 2011 during which both of their sons were relentlessly bullied by other students at Greenspun Junior High. According to the plaintiffs, the boys were “physically assaulted, sexually assaulted, harassed, bullied, [and] sexually discriminated against.”

Hairr says that she had no idea what was happening to her son. She knew that he was becoming increasingly withdrawn, wanting to spend time alone in his room rather than with his family. Bryan’s son began being bullied when he stood up for his friend. It was Bryan who eventually overheard the two boys talking about the abuse; neither child told the parents what had been happening to them.

The school also did not disclose the ongoing problem. “We all were in the blind,” said Hairr. Bryan said she would have been satisfied if administrators had been willing to talk to them about the situation before it turned into a lawsuit.

Now, a judge has ruled that the school district must pay $200,000 to each of the families affected by the bullying. Judge Nancy Allf argued in her decision that the school district had failed to protect the boys’ right to due process under the 14th Amendment.

The district may appeal, but it seems as though this case is already changing things. The district’s bullying policy is undergoing changes to make it more effective. However, Bryan and Hairr say that the changes will make little difference unless the district ensures that staff members comply with the policy.

Any anti-bullying policy is only good as far as it is implemented. Proper training and documentation can help districts to avoid lawsuits.

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Recently, California’s Department of Fair Employment and Housing, or DFEH, issued a revised “Workplace Harassment Guide for California Employers.” This essential publication should form the basis of every organization’s anti-harassment and retaliation policies. With the guidance of a qualified California employment attorney, most companies will be able to protect themselves from violating the guidelines described in the publication.

https://www.californiabusinesslitigation.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/283/2016/05/boy.girl_.-equality.jpgThe Guide is particularly useful to employers because it clearly describes the necessary elements of any anti-harassment program in California. Employers are recommended to develop a written policy that is given to all employees and is discussed at least once a year if not more often at company meetings. The Guide also offers counsel on how crucial it is for members of management to model appropriate behavior and responses to harassment complaints. Training for managers and supervisors similarly is recommended, as well as education for personnel who will be charged with handling complaints.

One of the most important tenets espoused by the publication is the need for a proper reporting system, and a means of ensuring that every report is treated as a high-priority item. This makes it possible for the employer to determine whether or not a full, formal investigation is required. One of the new Guide’s more useful sections educates managers and supervisors about how to investigate a claim. A prompt, thorough and impartial investigation is frequently able to head off more serious problems like harassment and retaliation lawsuits.

DFEH’s revised Guide is essential reading for every employer in California. Its plain language and good coverage of relevant points make it the perfect resource for an anti-harassment and retaliation policy. A skilled California employment lawyer can help any company owner or executive put the finishing polish on the organization’s program. Too many companies make the mistake of not creating a written policy until it is too late.

Executives who want to improve the chances that their company will not become embroiled in costly, time-consuming litigation will want to discuss the Guide and how it can be used to craft an anti-harassment program specifically for their company with a qualified attorney.

The guide is only 9 pages long. If after reading it you have any employment law questions, feel free to contact me, Richard Oppenheim. I may be reached at 818-461-8500 or by using the “Contact Us” box in the right column.

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Years of highly contested, and well-publicized, litigation have made employers aware of the dangers of discriminating against workers based on gender, sexual orientation, race and religion. It’s not unusual for company executives to work with an employment attorney when they are developing or revamping their practices. Unfortunately, age discrimination tends to be overlooked.

Age-Discrimination-132214651-e1500063954245This oversight is coming to the forefront with litigation filed in the U.S. District Court in New Jersey. Plaintiffs allege that their former employer, AT&T, systematically shed older workers in an effort to gain a workforce that has more advanced technological skills. The complaint relies largely on the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, a 1967 law that protects applicants and employees who are 40 or older. Essentially, the law makes it illegal for companies to make hiring, firing, promotion and compensation decisions based solely on age.

Plaintiffs argue that AT&T relied on age-based stereotypes to purge older workers. The process involved notifying the older workers that they had been placed on “surplus” status. They had a set amount of time within which they must be accepted into an alternative position within the company. However, the plaintiffs say that the selection process for those alternative positions was biased against the older employees who had been categorized as surplus. When they were unable to find another position, the workers were laid off.

Some of these employees say that they received a severance check, and that they were told by AT&T that they would be unable to sue the company under anti-discrimination laws if they took the money. Lawyers for the plaintiffs say that’s not necessarily the case, especially if the notice given to employees did not contain certain stipulated language.

The former employees cite a company blog post that described AT&T’s “Workplace 2020” program, which admitted that age-based stereotypes are being weighed in employment decisions. According to plaintiff descriptions of the blog post, older workers are the employees of yesterday while younger workers are considered more desirable.

This litigation serves as a timely reminder for all employers to be mindful of their employment practices with respect to older workers.

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The one-time owner of a successful car dealership group in California has been awarded more than $256 million by a jury. Mike Kahn, who ran the Superior Automotive Group with dealerships in LA and San Francisco, fought Nissan Motor Acceptance Corp. for eight years before achieving this judgment. NMAC is the financing arm of the Nissan company, and its representatives say that they plan to appeal this verdict.

1504001-Gavel-Money-2During the financial crash of 2008-2010, many new-car dealerships were struggling. Superior’s were among these, but this wasn’t always the case. Nissan had recognized Superior as one of the top three dealership groups in the world prior to 2008. The company had sold more than $1 billion of inventory in the period between 2001 and 2008. That all changed with the economic downturn. Suddenly, consumers weren’t buying cars.

Typically, car dealerships finance the purchase of new cars through an organization like NMAC. The loan on the car is frequently paid back when the car is sold to a consumer. However, with cars not moving, dealerships everywhere were defaulting on these loans. Mike Kahn’s dealerships were among these. He reached out to NMAC, asking for them to not default him on his outstanding loans. The company agreed, and then proceeded with a default anyway.

Kahn sold one of his dealerships to cover some of what he owed to NMAC, but it wasn’t enough. More than 800 employees were put out of work when all seven dealerships had to close, and NMAC sued Kahn for an additional $40 million while also seizing all of his personal and business assets. A relationship that once thrived was now deeply contentious.

Kahn countersued and eventually prevailed after nearly a decade of litigation. A jury awarded him compensatory and punitive damages in what appears to be an indictment of large corporations deliberately putting local companies on the chopping block. NMAC plans to appeal the decision, so this saga is not over yet. Nonetheless, this is an apt demonstration of how an excellent partnership can quickly go wrong, making the requirement for careful planning and good contracts a necessity.