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California Lawsuit Seeks Cancer Warning Label on Coffee

A majority of Americans rely on coffee to get them going. They expect to get a jolt, but should they also expect a cancer diagnosis? That’s the question behind a long-pending California lawsuit.

Coffee-Poison-80413335-150x150In 2010, an advocacy group called Council for Education and Research on Toxics (CERT) sued Starbucks and other coffee producers and retailers for not including a cancer warning label on their product. The Council is empowered to sue under a law from 1986 which was officially called Proposition 65. Also known as the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act, the law says that advocacy groups, citizens and lawyers may sue on behalf of the state.

In the case at hand, the Council says that much of the coffee consumed in California includes a carcinogen called acrylamide. The chemical is present in numerous foods, such as french fries, and is introduced naturally to coffee as a byproduct of roasting.

Lawyer Raphael Metzger is leading the charge, just as he did a few years ago when he won a case in which manufacturers of potato chips agreed to remove acrylamide from their products. His goal is for all businesses that make and sell coffee to use a clear and direct warning label so that consumers are informed that they will be ingesting acrylamide.

Some coffee companies already provide such a warning, but there are concerns that the wording is vague or that the label is not placed prominently enough to adequately warn consumers. Businesses in the coffee industry have been fighting the lawsuit for years. Their lawyers have argued that acrylamide is not present in large enough quantities to cause harm.

However, Superior Court Judge Elihu Berle did not think that the defense had presented sufficient evidence in support of their case. It is up to the defense to demonstrate that the chemical would not cause even one excess case of cancer per 100,000 people. The judge contended that the defense failed to do this.

This long-pending lawsuit is bound to continue. Speak with a business attorney to ensure that your products bear all appropriate warning labels.