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Parents Win Anti-Bullying Lawsuit Against Clark County School District

How well are anti-bullying policies being implemented in America’s schools? That question is at the heart of a case against Nevada’s Clark County School District. The parents who brought the case say that not only were they not informed about the bullying their sons suffered, but also that school officials did little to investigate or correct the situation.

schoolbullyingMothers Mary Bryan and Aimee Hairr had the assistance of the ACLU when they brought their lawsuit against the district. Their complaint detailed a horrific six months in 2011 during which both of their sons were relentlessly bullied by other students at Greenspun Junior High. According to the plaintiffs, the boys were “physically assaulted, sexually assaulted, harassed, bullied, [and] sexually discriminated against.”

Hairr says that she had no idea what was happening to her son. She knew that he was becoming increasingly withdrawn, wanting to spend time alone in his room rather than with his family. Bryan’s son began being bullied when he stood up for his friend. It was Bryan who eventually overheard the two boys talking about the abuse; neither child told the parents what had been happening to them.

The school also did not disclose the ongoing problem. “We all were in the blind,” said Hairr. Bryan said she would have been satisfied if administrators had been willing to talk to them about the situation before it turned into a lawsuit.

Now, a judge has ruled that the school district must pay $200,000 to each of the families affected by the bullying. Judge Nancy Allf argued in her decision that the school district had failed to protect the boys’ right to due process under the 14th Amendment.

The district may appeal, but it seems as though this case is already changing things. The district’s bullying policy is undergoing changes to make it more effective. However, Bryan and Hairr say that the changes will make little difference unless the district ensures that staff members comply with the policy.

Any anti-bullying policy is only good as far as it is implemented. Proper training and documentation can help districts to avoid lawsuits.