Published on:

Blind Man Sues Winn-Dixie Over Website ADA Compliance

Most companies have websites today. In fact, there are few business owners who would consider operating without one. That is because consumers are placing increasing reliance as websites to serve as proxies for brick-and-mortar locations. They may expect to shop, procure coupons, order photographic prints or even refill prescriptions from a website that is connected to a retail location.

ADA-138029727-001Everyone appreciates the convenience of being able to take care of a few errands online. However, not every company has fully considered whether or not their website is equally accessible to all users. That problem is at the heart of a recent lawsuit in Florida in which a legally blind man prevailed over well-known grocery chain Winn-Dixie.

Juan Carlos Gill liked shopping at Winn-Dixie because of its affordable pricing and convenient locations. An ad on television alerted him to the fact that Winn-Dixie’s website provided the ability to get digital coupons and refill prescriptions. When he tried to take advantage of these conveniences using the enhanced online software that allows a sight-challenged person to use the Internet with ease, Gil discovered that the Winn-Dixie website was incompatible. Try as he might, he could not avail himself of the useful services on the website that were readily available to consumers who were not sight impaired.

Gil sued Winn-Dixie for violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. Eventually, a two-day bench trial was held with Judge Robert N. Scola, Jr. presiding. Judge Scola ultimately sided with the plaintiff based on what he says is the company’s violation of Title III of the ADA. A witness for Winn-Dixie had testified that the company was in the midst of establishing its website’s ADA policy, and that they had set aside $250,000 for the task. An expert witness for Gil argued that his firm could have made the conversions for as little as $37,000. What’s more, relatively little time would be necessary to make the website accessible to the vision impaired.

Winn-Dixie might appeal this decision, but it is a timely reminder that all company websites should be reviewed for ADA compliance.

One more note of interest: Late last month Gil filed another similar lawsuit. In his lawsuit Gil is asking a federal court to force the owners of Germain Arena in Florida, Gale Force Sports and Entertainment, to make its website accessible to blind internet users.