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Employee in California Sues Employer’s Lawyer For Retaliation

 When an employer is sued by an employee, it’s natural to want to end the proceedings quickly. However, it is not legal for an employer to take any retaliatory action against a worker, especially one that is suing them. As a recent decision by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals demonstrates, it also may be illegal for an attorney acting on behalf of the employer to retaliate.

Retaliation-32004699-001José Arias was an undocumented alien who had been working for Angelo Dairy for a decade in 2006 when he filed a wage lawsuit. Arias alleged that he had not been paid for overtime hours and that he had not received mandatory rest and meal periods. The dairy retained lawyer Anthony Raimondo to represent them in the lawsuit. Raimondo began working on due diligence, looking into Arias’ past as well as examining other pertinent facts.

A few weeks before the trial was scheduled to begin, Arias had an appointment for a deposition. What he didn’t know was that Raimondo had gotten in touch with Immigration and Custom Enforcement, or ICE, which led the lawyer to the discovery that Arias had no legal status in the U.S. Further, Raimondo had arranged for Arias to be taken into ICE custody at the deposition. Arias learned of the plan and promptly settled the litigation.

Then, the next phase began. Arias filed suit against Raimondo for violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act. While the majority of the provisions in this law apply only to direct employers, the retaliation portions apply to employers and those who are empowered to act on their behalf. An initial court decision on the lawsuit sided with Raimondo, but Arias appealed the decision. The appeals court sided with him.

Most reputable employment lawyers are unlikely to recommend that their clients try to have an employee deported or otherwise take an adverse action against them. To do so only opens the employer up to more legal trouble, and the same is true for the lawyer who takes a direct, punitive action toward an employee. It is far better to let the courts decide.

Feel free to contact me, Richard Oppenheim with employment law questions. I may be reached at 818-461-8500 or by using the “Contact Us” box in the right column.