Published on:

Lowe’s Settles EEOC Lawsuit for $8.6 Million

Home improvement retail giant Lowe’s has agreed to pay an $8.6 million settlement to disabled workers that the company fired. The agreement was reached after the federal government’s Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed a lawsuit against the company in California.

Gardne center worker in a wheelchair holding a flower pot in a greenhouse

The settlement money will be distributed to former Lowe’s employees who were fired from the company between January 1, 2004 and May 13, 2010. Eligible employees were terminated after exceeding the company’s 180-day or 240-day medical leave policy. All of the affected employees were either disabled, “regarded as” disabled or were associated with someone who was disabled.

While Lowe’s stipulated a maximum leave policy of either 180 days or 240 days, officials with the EEOC argued that the policy was not in line with the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA. In fact, the EEOC charged that Lowe’s “engaged in a pattern and practice of discrimination” against employees who were disabled. Moreover, the lawsuit argued that Lowe’s routinely failed to provide adequate accommodations for disabled workers.

Also as a part of the settlement agreement, Lowe’s is required to hire ADA consultants who can help to reshape the company’s leave policies and assist them to address accommodation issues. Lowe’s will be required to create a system for recording and tracking employee requests for accommodation and how those requests are dealt with. Additionally, staff and management members across the company will be asked to undergo training related to ADA issues.

Lowe’s executives argue that they revamped their leave policies and more closely examined their compliance with ADA in 2010. Nonetheless, they agreed to this settlement to further the effort to comply with all facets of the ADA.

Lowe’s situation acts as an important lesson to other employers who are not sure if they are in compliance with all applicable aspects of ADA. Hiring a consultant or seeking legal advice before a serious problem arises is the best way to avoid a costly lawsuit from the EEOC or a former employee. Proactive measures toward offering accommodations and not violating ADA medical leave policies are important for any company that is seeking long-term success.