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Facebook Sued Over Sending Unsolicited Text Messages

Facebook is facing a federal lawsuit based on their practice of sending text messages to people who have been given recycled cell phone numbers.

search%20cell%20phone%2061969338-001.jpgWashington, D.C. resident Christine Holt is not a Facebook member. Nonetheless, when she got a new cell phone number, she began receiving text messages from the social network. The messages asked Holt what she was up to and kept her up to date on the activities of her “friends.” Holt requested that the company stop sending her text messages, but the practice continued.

Because Holt’s new cell phone number was previously used by someone else, it seems likely that the text messages are actually aimed at that prior user, who probably granted Facebook with permission to send messages. However, Holt never granted such permission, and she became annoyed when her requests that the company desist seemed to fall on deaf ears.

Holt hired Edelson, PC to represent her in a potential class action lawsuit. The complaint speculates that there may be thousands of potential class members who are receiving the same nuisance text messages. The practice is particularly troublesome because many of these people are not Facebook users. This provides them with extremely limited options when it comes to contacting the company. Ostensibly, the new owner of the cell phone number should be able to text “stop” to the offending number, which should effectively remove them from the autodial list. When this doesn’t work, frustrated people are left with little choice but to take legal action.

Under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, it is illegal for companies to embark on a text-messaging campaign without first obtaining written permission from the recipient. Violation of this law can result in a $500 fine per incident. With the social network sending multiple messages to potentially thousands of cell phone users, the damages to the company could be significant.

This situation makes it clear that it is always best to proceed with caution when it comes to contacting potential customers via text messaging. Relying on obtaining written permission is always the best way to go to avoid potential legal action.

Sylvester, Oppenheim & Linde represents businesses and their owners in most types of litigation. If your business has a legal problem, contact Richard Oppenheim directly for a prompt, no charge initial consultation. You may use the contact form in the left column or call 818-461-8500.