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Companies Sue for Rights to MOVA Technology

Technology plays an amazing role in Hollywood’s movies. Many of the most popular movies are visually stunning thanks to an array of high-tech gadgets. Today’s moviegoers are pretty savvy, and they are very familiar with the idea of motion capture, the process through which markers are placed on an actor’s body so that their movements can be faithfully recorded. A related technology, known as MOVA, is now the subject of more than one lawsuit.

Trademarks%2047837347-001.jpgMOVA works like motion capture, but it’s focused on the actor’s face. Phosphorescent makeup is applied to an actor’s face, and then specialized software and hardware work together to convert even the subtlest of facial expressions into data. The technology has already been used on many movies such as “Guardians of the Galaxy,” “Terminator Genisys,” “Deadpool” and more. MOVA is so successful that it received a Scientific and Technical Oscar award at a ceremony in early 2015. The trouble is, there seems to be quite a bit of disagreement about who developed MOVA and who actually owns the rights to it.

The first lawsuit came in February of 2015 when a Chinese tech company known as Shenzhenshi Haitiecheng Science and Technology, or SHST, filed a lawsuit in California against a company called Rearden LLC. The plaintiffs claimed that Rearden was wrongfully claiming ownership of MOVA. In the complaint, SHST alleges that ownership of the MOVA technology shifted several times in the months leading up to receipt of the Oscar. The technology was originally developed by inventor Steve Perlman, but SHST argues that he sold it to another organization. The assets traded hands two or three more times before coming to SHST.

Perlman and Rearden LLC have now launched a countersuit, claiming that SHST has committed various patent and copyright violations. Ultimately, Rearden’s complaint seeks to block the release of movies that use the MOVA technology until the courts can resolve who actually owns the rights to the invention. Legal consultants believe that the suit won’t be able to block the distribution of current films, but it may halt production on some before a settlement is reached.

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