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California’s Charter Schools the Subject of Lawsuits

With a total of more than 1,200 charter schools, California has the largest concentration of these alternative learning institutions in the country. Students and their parents may choose a charter school if they are interested in a more creative curriculum and the higher potential for one-on-one interaction with students.

school%20bus%20%26%20child%2044980077-001.jpgCharter schools encourage students to reach enhanced academic goals. Sometimes these alternative learning centers prove to be a valuable asset for at-risk youth too. School resource officers in California have been known to divert students who have gang affiliations or who are being recruited by gangs to charter schools, a maneuver that often puts them back on the right path.

However, not everyone is thrilled with the prevalence of charter schools in California. There are no fewer than six lawsuits pending in Los Angeles and San Diego counties that, if successful, might shut down or relocate several charter schools. The main point of contention concerns so-called Satellite Facilities, which may also be referred to as Resource Centers or Meeting Centers. Supporters of these lawsuits claim that many of these facilities exist in violation of the 1992 act that created the charter school system.

Plaintiffs allege that California Education Code Section 47605 places geographic restrictions on where charter schools can be located. Charter school proponents counter that this restriction applies only to school campuses and not to Satellite Facilities. A representative from the charter schools, says that these facilities are, resource centers used for non-classroom based independent study. Accordingly, charter school supporters believe that they should be able to open such facilities without having to adhere to the location restrictions.

Defendants in the lawsuit believe the problem all comes down to money. Charter schools are becoming increasingly popular. Enrollment has soared at facilities across the state, taking away students from traditional schools. This means less funding for these schools and more funding for charter schools.

These lawsuits are still in the early stages. It seems unlikely that charter schools will be disappearing, but supporters may be in for a fight when it comes to preserving existing facilities.