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Are WiFi Allergies Real? In Time, Science and Lawsuits May Reveal the Truth

Schools and businesses beware. Electromagnetic Hypersensitivity Syndrome (EHS) may be hurting your students, employees and customers. While Science has not yet proven a causal link between EHS and the symptoms of its growing numbers of sufferers, lawsuits are being filed here in the US and abroad.

WiFi%20sign%2068234810-001.jpgA woman in France has been awarded about $32,000 in compensation for pain and suffering brought about by an allergy to WiFi. She claimed that she was forced to relocate to the countryside because digital wireless transmissions caused her severe discomfort. Her award will be paid out over the next three years.

Recently, the parents of a 12 year old boy in Southboro Massachusetts have filed a lawsuit claiming that the schools WiFi signal is causing their son to become ill and lose focus and concentration in school.

The complaint alleges that the boy was diagnosed with EHS after experiencing headaches, nausea and nosebleeds after the Fay School installed new, stronger wireless internet equipment in 2013. The lawsuit seeks accommodations and $250,000 in damages.

The World Health Organization acknowledges that EHS is a collection of symptoms, but clarifies it is not a medical diagnosis, and the symptoms may not be caused by a single medical problem.

A number of EHS sufferers have relocated to Green Bank, West Virginia in the Appalachian foothills. Green Bank is within the 13,000 square mile radio free zone in the US. Virtually all wireless devices are against federal law in that zone.

Is the beginning of a trend of EHS lawsuits? Should schools and businesses pay closer attention to the wireless waves being showered on anyone nearby? Will EHS become an ADA issue/category? It is just too soon to tell, but we will keep you informed.