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California Court of Appeals Awards Harassed City of Los Angeles Employee $3.2 Million

A California appellate court has ruled in favor of a white employee who suffered from discrimination by his Hispanic boss. The court ordered the City of Los Angeles to give James Duffy $3.2 million for the harassment he received from his supervisor, Abel Perez.

Retaliation%2032004699-001.jpgAccording to court records, Perez told Duffy that he hated Caucasians. Three of Duffy’s Hispanic coworkers related that Perez also told them that he was biased against white people. Additionally, the court determined that Perez harassed Duffy because he was disabled.

Duffy was a gardener for the city from 1991 until 2010. In 2001, Perez began regularly calling his partially disabled subordinate insulting names and making up reasons to write him up for poor performance.

In 2004, Duffy received a workplace injury that resulted in a traumatic brain injury. The injury caused speech and cognitive difficulties for Duffy, including difficulty thinking and repetitive speech. Perez took advantage of Duffy’s added disabilities, ramping up the abuse and even hiding the man’s tools so that Perez could discipline him for not completing his work. He also forbade other employees from coming to Duffy’s aid.

Although he was eventually investigated and transferred, Perez continued to be Duffy’s indirect supervisor and maintained control over his assignments. Perez assigned Duffy harsher working conditions and began driving past Duffy as the man worked, honking his vehicle’s horn and yelling insults.

Throughout the years of abuse, Duffy made report after report. However, the abuse was never stopped. Perez, who maintains his position with the city, denies Duffy’s claims and insists he has never been disciplined by the parks department.

In spite of Perez’ protestations, however, the original court found in Duffy’s favor. The City of Los Angeles appealed the large settlement, claiming that Duffy waived his right to sue when he accepted early retirement. The city also claimed that video testimony of Duffy’s fatally ill wife taken during her deposition was inadmissible because it was hearsay.

The appellate court dismissed the city’s claims as groundless and ordered it to pay the settlement. According to Duffy’s legal counsel, the case was unusual in the realm of employee harassment cases because of the wealth of direct evidence to prove Duffy’s claims.

The case is James Duffy v. City of Los Angeles, available HERE.