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EEOC Issues New Enforcement Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination

A U.S. Supreme Court decision made in March 2015 has led the EEOC to issue a new enforcement guidance with respect to pregnancy discrimination. The amendments may impact employers going forward, and it’s best to be aware of the changes now in order to avoid possible future complaints that could lead to lawsuits.

Pregnant%20at%20work%202822222%20%282%29.jpgPart-time worker Peggy Young sued UPS, her employer, for not providing her with reasonable accommodations in relation to her pregnancy. Her doctor wanted her to follow certain lifting restrictions. Young asserted that other workers who had been injured received accommodations similar to those she was requesting, such as light duty, but that she was denied. Her case was decided via summary judgment by a lower court, so Young took the matter to the U.S. Supreme Court. The justices ruled that UPS had committed discrimination against Young because of her pregnancy. Accordingly, the summary judgment was vacated and the case continues on.

The EEOC felt it would be beneficial to issue a new enforcement guidance on pregnancy discrimination. Much of the document remains unchanged since the July 2014 update, which was the first revision to have been made in 30 years. The amendments relate to the treatment of workers who are pregnant and include a portion that addresses light duty work for such employees.

The changes are relatively minimal and leave much of the July 2014 revision unedited. For instance, there is no change on the stance about the illegality of firing or refusing to hire someone because they are pregnant and forced leave policies are still prohibited. Similarly, employers are still required to treat both male and female employees equally when considering parental leave.

Keeping up with EEOC changes is important for human resources personnel and for anyone within an organization who may make employment related decisions. A single misstep can have serious consequences, exposing an organization to long, costly litigation that may damage its reputation. Supervisors and managers may want to consult with an employment attorney regarding these EEOC updates to ensure that they are fully understood before being confronted by these issues in the workplace.