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Parents, Student Sue District Over Prayers at School Events

A question regarding whether or not prayer is appropriate in public schools has led to a lawsuit in Indiana. Jim and Nicole Bellar, along with their son who is identified as J.B., filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Hammond. The complaint alleges that the school violates the First Amendment rights of J.B. and other students by praying before various events.

team%20huddle.pray%2011360771-001.jpgJ.B. is a sophomore at River Forest Jr./Sr. High School in Hammond. The school is administrated by the River Forest Community School Corp., and prayers are allegedly a regular practice at school events. The Bellars say that J.B. has been forced to pray before participating in various sporting events. Prayers were also conducted at the graduation ceremony where J.B.’s older sister was graduated last year. The Bellars regularly attend the school district’s board meetings, and prayers are said before each session.

According to the Bellars the prayers all invoke God or Jesus Christ and are decisively Christian in nature. J.B. complained to his football coach about being asked to pray before games. The student was told to simply stay quiet during the prayers and was also instructed that he had to remained huddled with his teammates.

When that protest fell on deaf ears, J.B. and his father went to the district’s athletics director. Eventually they took their complaint to the principal and district leaders, all to no avail. At one point J.B. was told by administrators that he should improve his cooperation with the requests of his coaches.

The Indiana ACLU stepped in to assist the Bellar’s quest. While administrators turned a blind eye to the requests of the Bellar family to discontinue the prayers, it is unlikely that they can similarly ignore a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court.

If the Bellars prevail with the lawsuit, then the school district will be forced to give up its practice of holding prayers before events. They may also be asked to pay nominal damages and compensatory damages to the plaintiffs. As ACLU attorney Gavin Rose says, the prayers “represent a serious and flagrant affront to the First Amendment.”