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Compton Unified School District Challenged to Improve Educational Access

Public schools that are located in disadvantaged neighborhoods must deal with a complex problem every day. A number of their students is affected by trauma. Often this trauma is the result of being the victim of violence or witnessing violence. Sometimes the student is dealing with overwhelming poverty and unstable living conditions. Some must cope when a parent becomes incarcerated or passes away.

Psychology%20Brain%2081318172-001.jpgOne of the outcomes of this trauma is poor academic performance. Students who suffer this “complex trauma” have much greater chances of being suspended. Their grades are poor, and their attendance is spotty. Many of them never graduate. Some of them go directly from school into the jail system.

A recent lawsuit filed against the Compton Unified School District seeks to address these issues. The complaint argues that these students are suffering from complex trauma, which should be recognized as a disability. They cite evidence that children who live with trauma show different physical development in their brains and bodies as a result of this trauma. Thus, they should be considered a protected class.

Many of the children who experience trauma have behavioral problems or are overwhelmed by the conditions in which they live. The lawsuit argues that Compton Unified has not attempted to provide adequate accommodation for these students. It points out that students with obvious physical disabilities are given accommodations to make learning possible for them, and that students dealing with trauma should be similarly treated.

This lawsuit is just beginning. It seems clear that winning it will require a great deal of effort. While recognizing that the problem exists is an important first step, Compton Unified would have to come up with a comprehensive program to improve academic access for these children. The lawsuit suggests that the school district should provide mental health support for these students. Moreover, staff members should receive training that enables them to recognize trauma and deal effectively with it. A shift away from punishment for issues caused by trauma is also suggested.

Time will tell if Compton Unified will begin treating students affected by trauma as a protected class.