Published on:

Arizona Teacher Fired for Allegedly Defending Student Against Bullies

An elementary school teacher with 24 years of experience has been fired in Arizona. Pamela Aister, who was teaching fourth grade at Four Peaks Elementary School, was fired by officials from the Fountain Hills Unified School District after a bullying incident on the playground.

Fired%2053061626-001.jpgAister was supervising children on the playground when she noticed that a group of students had encircled a single African-American boy. The boy was Malachi Gillis, a 9 year-old who had recently transferred into Aister’s class. Gillis had a difficult history at the school. He joined Aister’s class after being repeatedly bullied by other students. Although Gillis had reported the bullying to his former teacher, playground aides and other adults, little had been done to rectify the situation.

Gillis alleges that the other students routinely used racial slurs and called him other names. When he could not get help from the grown-ups at his school, he became depressed. Eventually, he was moved to a different classroom, but the bullying didn’t stop.

What changed was that Aister stood up for her student when she saw him being threatened on the playground. Aister claims that she merely compelled the children to leave Gillis alone, telling them that, “He’s not alone anymore. If you’re picking on him, you’re picking on me.” One of the students accused of bullying Gillis reported the confrontation to parents who made a complaint to the district. Aister was fired for allegedly having used threatening language to students.

Aister has hired an attorney to represent her in the matter, although no lawsuit has been filed yet. Meanwhile, they are gathering support for their cause of having Aister reinstated in the classroom by holding press conferences and getting the word out about the situation. Gillis’ mother, Jennifer, notes that she may sue the district over the bullying and their refusal to do anything about it.

A Change.org petition has already gathered far more than 100,000 signatures aimed at getting Aister’s job back. Nonetheless, the district maintains its position that the well-being of students must always be put first and that Aister violated that trust.