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Michigan Sued by ACLU Over Children’s Right to Read

In a ground-breaking move, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Michigan has brought a lawsuit on behalf of the children of the state of Michigan. The suit asserts that the state, the Michigan Department of Education and the Highland Park school district have deprived children of their right to read. According to the ACLU, the defendants have violated the state’s constitution by neglecting to ensure that children are able to read at grade level.

illiteracy.jpgAccording to the executive director of the Michigan ACLU, Kary Moss, “Literacy is the gateway to all other knowledge.” Michigan law states that students who are below reading level are entitled to special help sufficient to get them up to grade level within 12 months, and the ACLU is seeking to force the state and its schools to meet that law.

The class action lawsuit was filed on behalf of a handful of children who represent the rest of the students in the district. According to court documents, the students all fell behind and remained woefully behind year after year but were never given the special help the law requires.

Highland Park is one of the poorest performing schools in America, according to the Michigan ACLU. In fact, one of Governor Rick Snyder’s first moves upon taking office was to appoint an emergency manager to attempt to help the district improve its performance.

Michigan’s attorney general, Bill Schuette, has not commented on the case. Both the Michigan Department of Education and a spokesperson for the governor stated they are unable to comment on the action, but the spokesperson did issue a statement that “Everything we have done and are doing is to ensure that the kids of Highland Park schools get the education they need and deserve.”

According to Moss, the case has implications that reach far beyond Michigan’s borders. “If we’re not preparing our children, there is no way our economy can recover,” said Moss.